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Clinics Open to LL.M. Students

During the 2013-2014 academic year, a variety of In-House Clinics, Externship Clinics, and Additional Courses with Limited Clinical Placements are available to LL.M. students. Please note that applications are due to clinical@law.harvard.edu by Aug 2, 2013 unless otherwise noted.

 

In-House Clinics

Cyberlaw | Emmett Environmental Law and Policy Clinic | Food Law and Policy Clinic
Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinic | Harvard Negotiation and Mediation Clinical Program
Health Law and Policy Clinic | International Human Rights Clinic | Making Rights Real: The Ghana Project
Shareholder Rights Clinic | Transactional Law Clinics | Veterans Law and Disability Benefits Clinic

 

CYBERLAW CLINIC

Instructors
Mr. Christopher Bavitz, Ms. Dalia Topelson

Description
Student engage in a wide range of real-world licensing, client counseling, advocacy, litigation, and policy projects and cases, covering a broad spectrum of Internet, new technology, and intellectual property legal issues. Among many other areas, the Clinic's work includes counseling and legal guidance regarding complex open access, digital copyright, and fair use issues; litigation, amicus filings, and other advocacy to protect online speech and anonymity; legal resources and advice for citizen journalists and public media entities; licensing and contract drafting and advice, including for Creative Commons and other "open" licenses; counseling innovators and entrepreneurs through the Harvard Innovation Lab; advising courts and creating resources for the use of technology to facilitate access to justice and the courts; guidance, policy development and amicus advocacy for effective but balanced protection of children in the areas of social networking, youth online safety, cyberbullying and child pornography/exploitation; addressing the use of technology in human trafficking; and counseling and drafting regarding complex questions of cybercrime and digital evidence.

Clinic Semesters
Fall clinic, Winter clinic, or Spring clinic

Pre or Co-requisite Classes
Students must take one of the following HLS courses prior to or during their clinic semester: Communications and Internet Law and Policy (Winter); Copyright (Spring); Music and Digital Media (Spring); Practical Lawyering in Cyberspace (Fall); or Trademark (Fall).

Note
Class enrollment is separate from clinic enrollment. There are a limited number of seats reserved for clinical students in Practical Lawyering in Cyberspace and Music and Digital Media. Prospective clinic students should preference one or more of the pre-/co-requisite classes during course preference registration, although enrollment is not guaranteed.

Clinic Website
cyber.law.harvard.edu/teaching/cyberlawclinic

To Apply
Submit a cover letter to clinical@law.harvard.edu by Aug 2, 2013 that includes relevant work or academic experience, the substantive areas and practice types you are interested in pursuing with the clinic, which semester you would like to participate in the clinic, and which course(s) you will preference to fulfill the pre-/co-requisite. If you are accepted to the clinic but are not able to enroll in one of the pre-/co-requisite courses, you will not be eligible to participate in the clinic.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW AND POLICY CLINIC

Instructors
Clinical Professor Wendy Jacobs, Mr. Shaun Goho

Clinic Description
**some externship placements**
Students have an opportunity to do hands-on, meaningful, real-life, and real-time environmental legal and policy work. Work includes local, national, and international projects covering the spectrum of environmental issues. Clinic students work on policy projects and white papers, regulatory and statutory drafting and comments, manuals and guidance to help non-lawyers identify and protect their rights, litigation and advocacy work, including developing case strategies, research and drafting briefs (filed in state and federal courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court), preparing witnesses and their testimony, and meeting with clients and attending and presenting at administrative and court hearings. Clients include state and municipal governments, non-governmental organizations, and research and policy institutions. The subject matter varies each semester, but is likely to include climate change mitigation and adaptation, offshore drilling and water protection, sustainable agriculture/aquaculture, ethics in the study of human exposure to environmental contaminants, and analysis of technologies such as carbon capture and sequestration and extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing.

Most students work on-campus at the ELPC clinic, though some may work off-campus with external organizations. Applicants will be interviewed for admission and students are carefully matched to their projects/placements.

Clinic Semesters
Fall clinic, Winter clinic, or Spring clinic

Pre or Co-requisite Classes
Students must take one of the following HLS courses prior to or during their clinic semester: Climate Energy Law and Policy (Spring); Environmental Law (Fall); Environmental Practice Skills, Methods and Controversies: Siting and Permitting a Wind Farm (Spring); Natural Resources Law (Winter); Public Interest Environmental Litigation (Fall); Advanced Environmental Law in Theory and Application (Spring).

Note
Class enrollment is separate from clinic enrollment. A limited number of clinical seats are reserved in Public Interest Environmental Litigation. Prospective clinic students should preference one or more of the pre-/co-requisite classes during course preference registration.

Clinic Website
law.harvard.edu/academics/clinical/elpc/index.html

To Apply
Submit a cover letter to clinical@law.harvard.edu by Aug 2, 2013 that describes your interest in environmental law and any relevant work or academic experience.  In your letter, indicate if you are interested in the fall, winter, or spring semester, and which class you plan to enroll in (remember that class enrollment is separate from clinic enrollment).  Applicants will be interviewed for admission either by phone in the summer, or in person during orientation.  If you are accepted to the clinic but are not able to enroll in one of the pre-/co-requisite courses, you will not be eligible to participate in the clinic.

 

FOOD LAW AND POLICY CLINIC

Instructor
Ms. Emily Broad Leib

Description
The projects undertaken by this clinic aim to increase access to healthy foods, prevent diet-related diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, and assist small farmers and producers in participating in food markets. Projects will help students to hone a number of skills, including research and writing of legal and policy documents, reports, and training materials; statutory interpretation, as well as drafting of legislation and regulations; conducting interviews and fact-finding with clients, stakeholders, and governmental agencies; and public speaking through conducting presentations and training. Clinic clients are located around the United States, and some students will have the opportunity to travel to the southeastern states, as we work closely with partners in Mississippi, Tennessee, Arkansas, and North Carolina.   

Clinic Semesters
Fall clinic or Spring clinic

Co-requisite Class
Food Law and Policy (Fall seminar or Spring seminar). Seats in this course are reserved for clinical students. Once enrolled in the clinic, the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs will enroll students in the required course.

To Apply
Submit a cover letter to clinical@law.harvard.edu by Aug 2, 2013 detailing your interest in the clinic and outlining any relevant experience. Students must be familiar with U.S. law and policy systems and be prepared to lead community-based projects throughout the United States. Applicants will be interviewed for admission.

 

HARVARD IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE CLINIC

Instructors
Clinical Professor Deborah Anker, Ms. Sabrineh Ardalan

Description
**some externship placements**
This clinic focuses on direct representation of individuals applying for U.S. asylum and related relief, as well as representation of individuals who have survived domestic violence and other crimes and/or who seek avoidance of forced removal in immigration proceedings. Students take the lead in representing clients from all over the world who are seeking protection from being returned to human rights abuses in their country of origin, protection from exile after years of living in the United States, or reunification with their families. Students are either placed at Harvard or at its partner clinic, Greater Boston Legal Services (located in downtown Boston).

Clinic Semesters
Fall clinic or Spring clinic

Clinic Website
law.harvard.edu/academics/clinical/hirc/index.html

Co-requisite Class
Immigration and Refugee Advocacy: Clinical Seminar (Fall seminar or Spring seminar). Seats in this course are reserved for clinical students. Once enrolled in the clinic, the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs will enroll students in the required course.

To Apply
Submit a one-page cover letter to clinical@law.harvard.edu by Aug 2, 2013 that describes your interest in the clinic and/or relevant experience in the fields of international refugee law, human rights law, or immigration law (of any country). Include which semester you want to participate.  Applicants need not have prior legal or academic experience in this area and students with a new or exploratory interest in these fields are welcome.  If there are more applicants than spaces available, preference will be given to students with the strongest demonstrated interest in the fields of refugee, immigration and/or human rights law, and those students whose academic and career goals have the closest connection to these fields. Applicants may be interviewed for admission.

 

HARVARD NEGOTIATION AND MEDIATION CLINIC

Instructors
Clinical Professor Robert Bordone, Mr. Chad Carr

Description
Students typically collaborate in teams on one project, from start to finish, for one client.  Projects typically focus on “advanced” issues related to negotiation, mediation, and conflict management. In addition to applying the skills and concepts learned in Negotiation Workshop (a pre-requisite course), students develop new skills that may include conducting interviews for stakeholder assessments, facilitating dialogue, running focus groups, leading teams, and presenting to clients. The clinic offers a mix of public, private, domestic, and international projects. Students may have the chance to manage senior level client relationships and are asked to work through difficult concepts and problems directly with clients and their clinical supervisor.

Clinic Semesters
Spring clinic

Clinic Website
law.harvard.edu/academics/clinical/hnmcp

Pre-requisite Class
Negotiation Workshop (Winter-Spring course or Spring course).

Note
Clinic applicants apply/enroll separately for the pre-requisite Negotiation Workshop course. LLM students must apply separately to the Negotiation Workshop using an online application, available from Aug-Oct 2013.

Co-requisite Class
Negotiation and Mediation Clinical Seminar (Spring). Once enrolled in the clinic, the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs will enroll students in the required course.

To Apply
Review the list of current and past clinical projects on the HNMCP website. Submit a cover letter to clinical@law.harvard.edu by Aug 2, 2013 addressing which projects are most interesting to you and why; describe your interest in HNMCP, and explain how it relates your past experience or future career goals.

 

HEALTH LAW AND POLICY CLINIC

Instructor
Clinical Professor Robert Greenwald

Description
Students enrolled in the clinic will participate in a broad range of national and state law and policy initiatives aimed at increasing access to quality, comprehensive health care for poor and low-income individuals and families - especially those living with chronic medical conditions. Through the clinic, students work to inform cutting-edge policy recommendations at the state and national levels in both the legislative and regulatory arenas. Student projects have involved informing both national and state level implementation of the Affordable Care Act through regulatory comments and analysis, providing law and policy analysis to national and state coalitions advocating to protect the Medicaid program, and investigating best practices at the state and local level, to support the development of new initiatives to increase access to treatment and service programs specifically designed to serve vulnerable populations.

Clinic Semesters
Fall clinic or Spring clinic

Co-requisite Class
Public Health Law and Policy (Fall seminar or Spring seminar). Seats in this course are reserved for clinical students. Once enrolled in the clinic, the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs will enroll students in the required course.

To Apply
Submit a cover letter to clinical@law.harvard.edu by Aug 2, 2013 detailing your interest in the clinic and outlining any relevant experience. Students must be familiar with U.S. law and policy systems and be prepared to lead community-based projects throughout the United States. Applicants will be interviewed for admission.

 

INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CLINIC

Instructors
Clinical Professors Tyler Giannini and Susan Farbstein, Ms. Bonnie Docherty, Mr. Fernando Delgado, Ms. Deborah Popowski, Mr. Chris Jochnick

Description
Students merge theory with practice and learn core skills necessary to become effective and thoughtful human rights advocates. Students work on pressing and timely human rights problems around the world, in collaboration with leading international and local human rights organizations. When appropriate, students may travel to investigate abuses or pursue advocacy outside Cambridge, participate in sessions before intergovernmental bodies and arguments before courts, and formulate policy to promote respect for human rights principles and the rule of law. The clinic delves into a wide range of issues, including extrajudicial executions, torture, and criminal justice; the unlawful use of cluster munitions and other weapons; civilian protection in armed conflict; sexual and reproductive rights; human rights and the environment; business and human rights; the role of health professionals in torture; Alien Tort Statute litigation; transitional justice; civil and political rights; economic, social, and cultural rights; and many more. This wide range of skills, as well as thematic and geographic knowledge, exposes students to a variety of strategies and innovative techniques for promoting and protecting human rights.

Clinic Semesters
Fall clinic or Spring clinic

Clinic Website
law.harvard.edu/programs/hrp/ihrc.html

Co-requisite Classes
Fall clinic students take either Human Rights Advocacy OR Armed Conflict and Humanitarian Protection. Spring clinic students take either Human Rights Advocacy OR Business and Human Rights: Clinical Seminar. Seats in these courses are reserved for clinical students. Once enrolled in the clinic, the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs will work with students to get them enrolled in one of the required courses.

Note
Students in the seminars listed above are all enrolled in same the International Human Rights Clinic (IHRC). Each term, IHRC includes students from both seminars and clinic projects cover a diverse range of human rights issues and topics beyond that of their seminar. While each seminar may have a specific focus, students can work with supervisors or students who are not in the same seminar.

To Apply
Submit a cover letter to clinical@law.harvard.edu by Aug 2, 2013 that indicates which semester and course(s) listed above you are interested in, as well as an explanation of your interest in the clinic, course, and any relevant prior experience.

 

MAKING RIGHTS REAL: THE GHANA PROJECT CLINIC

Instructor
Professor Lucie White

Clinic Description 
**travel required**
The Making Rights Real clinic will build on a partnership between Professor White, Harvard law students, and a network of Ghanaian Human Rights / Development organizations which began in 2002. Each year this team plans and implements the winter's activities, which focus on a dimension of economic and social rights implementation on the ground. Thus the team might focus on the negative impact of mining or similar development issues that are exploitive to communities, on the ground. Within such a broad issue, the work will address a range of human rights, such as access to education, health care, securing a livelihood, and having a voice in policy formation. Specific clinical activities include the full range of conventional and community lawyering strategies, such as legal research and analysis; reviewing and drafting legislation and regulations; strategy mapping; human rights documentation; participatory action research; partner briefings; designing and facilitating grassroots education and empowerment workshops; conducting community meetings; and working with media. In January of 2014, the work will take place primarily in Ghana's high poverty far north, with some activities taking place in the Accra region.

Clinic Semester
Winter clinic

Co-requisite Class
Making Rights Real: The Ghana Project (full-year class). Seats in this course are reserved for clinical students. Once enrolled in the clinic, the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs will enroll students in the required course.

To Apply
Submit a 1-2 page cover letter to clinical@law.harvard.edu by Aug 15, 2013 explaining your interest in this clinical program.

 

SHAREHOLDER RIGHTS CLINIC

Instructors
Professor Lucian Bebchuck, Mr. Scott Hirst

Description
The Shareholder Rights Project (SRP) provides students with the opportunity to obtain hands-on experience with shareholder rights work. The SRP works on behalf of public pension funds and charitable organizations seeking to improve corporate governance at publicly traded companies in which they are shareowners, as well as on research and policy projects related to corporate governance. In addition to clinical work, students will participate in classroom sessions to provide background and knowledge that compliments the work undertaken in the clinic.

Clinic Semester
Fall-Spring clinic

Co-requisite Class
Shareholder Rights Clinical Seminar (Fall-Spring class). Seats in this course are reserved for clinical students. Once enrolled in the clinic, the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs will enroll students in the required course.

To Apply
Students must submit a statement of interest (maximum 200 words), an academic transcript (unofficial or official), and can elect to submit a writing sample of no more than 15 pages (one sample only). Applications should be addressed to the instructors and submitted to Emily Lewis at emlewis@law.harvard.edu. Applications will be considered on a rolling basis, and interested students are encouraged to apply as early as possible.

 

TRANSACTIONAL LAW CLINICS

Instructor
Clinical Professor Brian Price

Description
Students in the clinic engage in actual legal practice with real clients involved in transactional matters. Students practice under the supervision and mentoring of an experienced practitioner in one or more of the three TLC clinics: Business and Non-Profit, Real Estate, and Entertainment Law (Recording Artists Project). TLC clients include entrepreneurs, small businesses, non-profit organizations, real estate parties, community development corporations, and individuals and companies in the art and entertainment industry. Students will have direct hands-on responsibility for handling their cases and will gain experience in various aspects of transactional practice. Depending upon their clinical concentration and client needs, students typically have opportunities to engage in entity formation; start-up financing; contract negotiation and drafting; applications for tax-exemption; commercial financing; business acquisition; commercial leasing; licensing and permitting; trademark and copyright; corporate governance and compliance; real estate transactions and development; affordable housing development; zoning; condominium development; and other transactional legal work.

Clinic Semesters
Fall clinic or Spring clinic

Co-requisite Class
Transaction Practice Clinical Workshop (Fall seminar or Spring seminar). Seats in this course are reserved for clinical students. Once enrolled in the clinic, the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs will enroll students in the required course.

To Apply
No application is necessary. Interested students may add onto the clinic waitlist once the add/drop period is available on Helios (the HLS student registration system).

 

VETERANS LAW AND DISABILITY BENEFITS CLINIC

Instructor
Clinical Professor Dan Nagin

Description
Students work in one of three WilmerHale Legal Services Center clinical practice areas: Disability Law, Veterans and Public Benefits, or Estate Planning. Students represent indigent clients in a variety of subject areas, all with a focus on enhancing financial stability, fostering asset accumulation, and improving access to healthcare.

Clinic Semesters
Fall clinic or Spring clinic  

Co-requisite Class
Veterans Law and Disability Benefits Clinical Seminar (Fall seminar or Spring seminar). Seats in this course are reserved for clinical students. Once enrolled in the clinic, the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs will enroll students in the required course.

Clinic Website
law.harvard.edu/academics/clinical/lsc/index.htm

To Apply
Submit a cover letter to clinical@law.harvard.edu by Aug 2, 2013 that explains your interest, relevant work or academic experience, clinical practice area preference as between Disability Law, Veterans and Public Benefits, or Estate Planning, and whether you prefer to do a Fall clinic or a Spring clinic.

 

Externship Clinics

Externship clinics are connected to courses taught at HLS, but consist of placements at external organizations

Capital Punishment Clinic | Child Advocacy Clinic | Employment Law Clinic
Judicial Process in Community Courts | Sports Law Clinic | Supreme Court Litigation Clinic

 

CAPITAL PUNISHMENT CLINIC

Instructor
Professor Carol Steiker

Description
The Capital Punishment Clinic offers opportunities for students to represent clients with capital sentences through externship placements at capital punishment resource centers, organizations, law firms, and governmental agencies throughout the country. Clinical work is full-time and on-site during the winter term, and continues on a part-time and remote basis in the spring term.

Clinic Semester
Winter-Spring clinic

Co-requisite Class 
Capital Punishment in America (Fall).  Seats are reserved for clinic students. Once enrolled in the clinic, the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs will enroll students in the required course

To Apply
Submit a cover letter to clinical@law.harvard.edu by Aug 2, 2013 that explains your interest and any relevant academic or work experience.

 

CHILD ADVOCACY CLINIC

Instructor
Ms. Jessica Budnitz

Description
This clinic educates students about a range of social change strategies and encourages critical thinking about the pros and cons of different approaches.  A variety of substantive areas impacting the lives of children are addressed, with a focus on child welfare (abuse and neglect, foster care, and adoption), education, and juvenile justice. This clinic is relevant for students with a particular interest in children's issues but also for those more generally interested in law reform and social change.  Students are placed in a wide array of external organizations, ranging from groups providing individual advocacy, to those promoting systemic change through impact litigation and legislative reform, to grassroots organizing initiatives. Some students will work for reform from within the system while others will work from outside.

Clinic Semester
Spring clinic

Co-requisite Class
Child Advocacy Clinical Seminar (Spring). Seats are reserved for clinic students. Once enrolled in the clinic, the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs will enroll students in the required course.

Clinic Website
law.harvard.edu/programs/about/cap/clinic/index.html

To Apply
Submit a cover letter to clinical@law.harvard.edu by Aug 2, 2013 that explains your interest in the clinic and any prior related experience (courses, internships, volunteer work, jobs focused on child advocacy).

 

EMPLOYMENT LAW CLINIC

Instructor
Mr. Stephen Churchill

Description
This clinic focuses on rights in the workplace, with a particular emphasis on state and federal laws that prohibit discrimination, harassment, and retaliation based on race, sex, disability, and other protected characteristics. Work may also address issues such as unemployment benefits, wage and hour claims, severance negotiations, union issues, workplace safety, and more. Local externship placements include private firms, non-profit/advocacy groups, or government agencies.  

Clinic Semesters
Fall clinic or Spring clinic

Co-requisite Class
Fall clinic students take Employment Law Workshop: Advocacy Skills.  Spring clinic students take Employment Law Workshop: Strategies for Social Change. Seats in this course are reserved for clinical students. Once enrolled in the clinic, the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs will enroll students in the required course.

To Apply
Submit a cover letter to clinical@law.harvard.edu by Aug 2, 2013 that explains your interest, relevant practice or academic experience, and placement expectations. Include which clinic semester(s) you prefer.

 

JUDICIAL PROCESS IN COMMUNITY COURTS CLINIC

Instructor
The Honorable John Cratsley (Retired)

Description
Students work with individual justices of the District Court, Boston Municipal Court, Juvenile Court, Housing Court, Land Court, and Superior Court departments of the Massachusetts Trial Court, and with judges of the U.S. District Court for Massachusetts. Students work alongside a judge while observing court as well as doing legal research and writing. Students gain insight into judicial reasoning and decision-making. They will also have the opportunity to discuss a variety of trials, opinions, sentences, and other judicial matters with their supervising judge. Students are expected to both observe court proceedings, complex and simple; be available for legal research and drafting assignments from their judge; and observe and assist their judge for at least 2 clinical credits, or ten hours per week (one full day or two mornings).

Clinic Semesters
Spring clinic

Clinic Website
law.harvard.edu/academics/clinical/clinics/judicial.html

Co-requisite Class
Judicial Process in Community Courts (Spring seminar). Seats in this course are reserved for clinical students. Once enrolled in the clinic, the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs will enroll students in the required course.

To Apply
Submit a cover letter to clinical@law.harvard.edu by Aug 2, 2013 that describes your interest and any relevant work or academic experience.


SPORTS LAW CLINIC

Instructor
Mr. Peter Carfagna

Description
Students are placed with external organizations practicing sports law, including legal departments of major leagues or sports franchises, and with law firms and lawyers representing individual players, teams, or leagues. Work may include contract and transactional work, arbitration, litigation, research, and writing.

Clinic Semester(s)
Winter clinic or Spring clinic

Pre-/Co-requisite Class
Students must take one of the following classes before or during the clinic semester: Sports Law: Advanced Contract Drafting (Fall class), Sports and the Law: Examining the Legal History and Evolution of America's Three "Major League" Sports: MLB, NFL and NBA (Fall class), or Sports and the Law: Representing the Professional Athlete (Winter class).

Note
Class enrollment is separate from clinic enrollment.  Prospective clinic students should preference one or more of these classes during course preference registration.  The class will not limit the clinic projects available to you.  

To Apply
Submit a resume and cover letter to clinical@law.harvard.edu by Aug 2, 2013 that describes any prior sports law experience, your interest in working with a particular league or team, your interest in developing your own placement, and your preferred semester of clinical.


SUPREME COURT LITIGATION CLINIC

Instructors
Mr. Thomas Goldstein, Mr. Kevin Russell, Mr. Jonathan Massey

Description
Students work in Washington, D.C. to facilitate interaction between students, instructors and the litigation process at the Supreme Court. Students are fully involved in intensive work on actual cases before the Court, and participate in a series of lectures and classroom discussions on Supreme Court practice.

Clinic Semesters
Winter clinic

Co-requisite Class
Supreme Court Litigation (Winter). Seats in this course are reserved for clinical students. Once enrolled in the clinic, the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs will enroll students in the required course.

To Apply
Submit an academic transcript (unofficial is fine) and an unedited writing sample (a writing sample not edited by anyone other than the author) of fifteen to twenty pages to clinical@law.harvard.edu by Aug 2, 2013.

 

Additional Courses with Limited Clinical Placements 

These courses are mainly comprised of non-clinical students, but have a few seats reserved for students participating in a related clinical component.

Delivery of Legal Services | Mediation | Responsibilities of Public Lawyers

 

DELIVERY OF LEGAL SERVICES

Instructor
Ms. Jeanne Charn

Description  
**
externship placements**
This clinical placement offers students the opportunity to work with local organizations dedicated to expanding access to the civil justice system in the United States.

Clinic Semesters
Fall clinic or Spring clinic

Co-requisite Class
Legal Profession: Ethical and Professional Challenges in New Approaches to Personal Service Law Practice (Fall) or Legal Profession: Delivery of Legal Services (Spring). Seats are reserved for clinical students. Once enrolled in the clinical, the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs will enroll students in the required course.

To Apply
Submit a cover letter to clinical@law.harvard.edu by Aug 2, 2013 that explains your interest and preferences of work, placement, and semester.

 

MEDIATION

Instructors
Mr. David Hoffman (class component), Ms. Prill Ellis (clinic component)

Description 
**
in-house placements**
Students are given an opportunity to observe and conduct mediations in small claims courts in the Boston area. Clinical students must complete HMP's 32-hour basic mediation training and mediate or observe in small claims court every week during the spring semester and work one hour per week in the HMP office. Clinical students also keep a weekly journal reflecting on their mediation experiences and write a short “final report” at the end of the semester. The HMP mediation training is required, and will occur during the course of two full weekends in February.

Clinic Semesters
Spring clinic

Co-requisite Class
Mediation (Spring course). Seats in this course are reserved for clinical students. Once enrolled in the clinical, the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs will enroll students in the required course.

To Apply
No application is necessary. Interested students may add their names to the clinical waitlist once the add/drop period is available on Helios (the HLS student registration system).

 

RESPONSIBILITIES OF PUBLIC LAWYERS

Instructor
Professor Lani Guinier

Description
**
externship placements**
Clinical placements are with various local governmental, non-profit, law firms, and legal services organizations. Students should have at least one full day open in their schedule for clinical work.

Clinic Semester
Spring clinic

Co-requisite Class
Legal Profession: Responsibilities of Public Lawyers (Spring class). Seats in this course are reserved for clinical students. Once enrolled in the clinical, the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs will enroll students in the required course.

To Apply
Submit a cover letter to clinical@law.harvard.edu by Aug 2, 2013 that describes your interest and any relevant work or academic experience.

Last modified: July 01, 2013

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